Thursday, October 13, 2011

Occupy Fairbanks Rally And March Scheduled For October 15th In Fairbanks; Occupy Anchorage And Occupy Homer Also Planning To Rally

Note: All posts about Occupy Alaska available HERE, with the most recent post displaying first.

The Occupy Wall Street movement has now spread beyond Anchorage. The Occupy Fairbanks group has formed, and announced on Twitter their intention to hold a rally and march on Saturday October 15th, 2011.

Participants are asked to form up at Sadler's parking lot in Fairbanks by 11:30 A.M. on Saturday. Beginning at noon, they will march from Airport Way down Cushman Street to the Cushman Street bridge. Based on the Twitter feed, it appears activists opposing the Pebble Mine will also be participating; this means it's also a great opportunity for those who support the Schaeffer Cox Five and the recently-convicted Jim Wilde and oppose abusive TSA behavior to join the protest and to more widely publicize the federal government's persecution of these individuals. When all is said and done, the two core issues are corporate abuse and government tyranny.

Lacey Brewster, an organizer of the march, told the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner “We’re going to be participating in that worldwide protest...We basically want to have a forum for people who are not happy with the current state of things.”

An Occupy Homer group has also formed and announced tentative plans for a rally at the WKFL Park at the corner of Pioneer Avenue and Heath Street in downtown Homer on October 15th, most likely beginning at 12:00 P.M. A Tweet on Occupy Homer Twitter indicates there might be Occupy Kenai-Soldotna and Occupy Juneau groups forming as well. Of course, Occupy Anchorage will be holding their own event at Towne Square beginning at 12:00 P.M. on Saturday.



One Juneau resident, Hannah Wolf, has been participating in the OWS event in New York City. She explained that the driving force behind the protests is frustration. Though she said her demographic is well represented, she describes it as a movement not of one demographic, nor the political left or right, but of the American people who are angry when they are told that hiring is right around the corner, that the recession is ending and that our elected officials are working for us, only to find that the government is stalled and unemployment rates persist.

Some of the demands of the OWS movement back east are obviously excessive; the demands include ending corporate personhood, institution of taxes on stock purchases, nationalized banking, socialized medicine, fully funded government jobs, lifted restrictions on labor organizing, turning foreclosed homes into public housing and investing in green energy infrastructure. But despite reports of misbehavior like defecating on the flag and on police cruisers from other QWS events back east, Alaskans should keep an open mind about the Occupy Alaska events. So far, Occupy Anchorage participants have behaved in a scrupulously law-abiding fashion, and the chief organizer, Brian MacMillan, has bent over backwards to keep it non-partisan. Yes, the group will be dominated by those on the political left, but it's a good opportunity for those of us on the right to show up and do some bridge-building. People of all political persuasions have been affected by TSA abuse and the incessant fee-gouging by the big banks and the airline industry. The Occupy movement provides visible and vocal opposition to these practices.

2 comments:

  1. These people should be marching on the Whitehouse. The current administration has made the economic condition in America significantly worse after promising much better performance. Of course, they will not do this because they support the socialist viewpoint of the current administration. It's also interesting that President Obama has taken a record about of donations from the very Wall Street CEO's that these people protest. Sheer idiocy.

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  2. That's actually a good thought, and if these protests in their present form don't produce some remedial action, marching on the White House and on Congress would be a logical next step.

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