Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Alaska 2010 Census Data Officially Released; Alaska's Population Grew By 13 Percent To 710,231, And Anchorage's Population Is Up To 291,826

On March 15th, 2011, the U.S. Census Bureau released official population statistics from the 2010 census for the state of Alaska. They show that Alaska grew by 13 percent during the past decade to its present population of 710,231, which is still not enough for us to qualify for a second U.S. House District. The fastest-growing county equivalent was the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, increasing by 50 percent to 88,995. Anchorage continues steady growth, increasing by 12.1 percent to a population of 291,826. And Fairbanks, which was officially only the third largest city in Alaska in 2000, snuck past Juneau to become the state's second largest city at 31,535.

Racially, non-Hispanic Whites continue to dominate the state, with 64.1 percent of the total, while Alaska Natives are second, with 14.4 percent. Hispanics checked in third at 5.5 percent, just nosing out Asians who were at 5.3 percent. The most explosive percentage growth was registered by Pacific Islanders, who increased their population by 123.9 percent during the decade; multiracials experience the second highest growth rate at 51.9 percent, just nosing out Asians at 51.8 percent.

Perhaps the most important task growing out of this census is legislative redistricting. The Redistricting Board has 30 days, beginning from Tuesday March 15th, to come up with a draft redistricting plan, and 60 days to present a final plan. With the bulk of the population increase concentrated in Anchorage, Mat-Su, Fairbanks and the Kenai Peninsula, the new numbers will most likely require a reduction in districts in Southeast and rural Alaska and an increase in districts on the road system. A preliminary analysis already shows five House districts losing at least 17 percent of their population from 2002-2010, and at least one rural district may be abolished altogether. Find out more about the board's efforts HERE. Alaska Dispatch has published an in-depth article describing the redistricting process.

Preliminary census information also indicates that based upon estimates between 2002 and 2007, the number of American Indian and Alaska Native-owned businesses increased by 17.7 percent while total number of US businesses increased 17.9 percent during the same time frame. Receipts generated by all surveyed Native-owned businesses in 2007, totaling $34.4 billion, represented a 28-percent increase from 2002.

The Census Bureau issued the primary release in the form of a cumbersome zipped file that requires an unzip utility. I was unable to get the Windows 7 built-in unzipper to give me readable data; all I got were a bunch of 1's and 0's. However, there is a series of five custom tables available HERE. The tables are in Excel XLS format, but can be read using any Excel-compatible spreadsheet. The five tables provide basic population information for each county equivalent, the 20 largest cities, and racially-stratified information. The Alaska Department of Labor has also created a portal which provides population figures on all Alaska communities. I've posted the most pertinent results after the jump.



Table 1 provides basic population statistics:

County Equivalents: Defined as organized entities such as municipalities, boroughs, combined city-boroughs, and unorganized entities such as census areas:

-- Anchorage Municipality: 291,826
-- Fairbanks North Star Borough: 97,581
-- Matanuska-Susitna Borough: 88,995
-- Kenai Peninsula Borough: 55,400
-- Juneau City and Borough: 31,275
-- Bethel Census Area: 17,013
-- Kodiak Island Borough: 13,592
-- Ketchikan Gateway Borough: 13,477
-- Valdez-Cordova Census Area: 9,636
-- Nome Census Area: 9,492
-- North Slope Borough: 9,430
-- Sitka City and Borough: 8,881
-- Northwest Arctic Borough: 7,523
-- Wade Hampton Census Area: 7,459
-- Southeast Fairbanks Census Area: 7,029
-- Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area: 5,588
-- Aleutians West Census Area: 5,561
-- Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area: 5,559
-- Dillingham Census Area: 4,847
-- Petersburg Census Area: 3,815

Incorporated Areas (Cities): Limited to cities of 500 or more in population.

-- Anchorage: 291,826
-- Fairbanks: 31,535
-- Juneau: 31,275
-- Sitka: 8,881
-- Ketchikan: 8,050
-- Wasilla: 7,831
-- Kenai: 7,100
-- Kodiak: 6,130
-- Bethel: 6,080
-- Palmer: 5,937
-- Homer: 5,003
-- Unalaska: 4,376
-- Barrow: 4,212
-- Soldotna: 4,163
-- Valdez: 3,976
-- Nome: 3,598
-- Kotzebue: 3,201
-- Petersburg: 2,948
-- Seward: 2,693
-- Wrangell: 2,369
-- Dillingham: 2,329
-- Cordova: 2,239
-- North Pole: 2,117
-- Houston: 1,912
-- Craig: 1,201
-- Hooper Bay: 1,093
-- Akutan: 1,027
-- Sand Point: 976
-- Delta Junction: 958
-- Selawik: 829
-- Togiak: 817
-- Mountain Village: 813
-- Emmonak: 762
-- Hoonah: 760
-- Klawock: 755
-- Gambell: 681
-- Alakanuk: 677
-- Point Hope: 674
-- Noorvik: 668
-- Toksook Bay: 590
-- Fort Yukon: 583
-- Kotlik: 577
-- Pilot Station: 568
-- Shishmaref: 563
-- Kake: 557
-- Stebbins: 556
-- Wainwright: 556
-- New Stuyahok: 510
-- St. Mary's: 507
-- Aniak: 501

Census-Designated Places (CDP): Communities which are organized but not formally incorporated. This list limited to the more significant CDPs:

-- Meadow Lakes CDP: 7,570
-- Knik/Fairview CDP: 14,923
-- Tanaina CDP: 8,197
-- Talkeetna CDP: 876
-- Willow CDP: 2,102
-- Big Lake CDP: 3,350
-- Gateway CDP: 5,552
-- Fishhook CDP: 4,679
-- Sutton/Alpine CDP: 1,447
-- Butte CDP: 3,246
-- Nikiski CDP: 4,493
-- Sterling CDP: 5,617
-- College CDP: 12,964
-- Ester CDP: 2,422
-- Yakutat CDP: 662
-- Skagway CDP: 920
-- Haines CDP: 1,713
-- Prudhoe Bay CDP: 2,174

Table 2 provides separate racial breakdowns, first without Hispanics, and then with Hispanics:

Total population: 710,231
-- White: 473,576 (66.7 percent)
-- Black or African-American: 23,263 (3.3 percent)
-- American Indian and/or Alaska Native: 104,871 (14.8 percent)
-- Asian: 38,135 (5.4 percent)
-- Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 7,409 (1.0 percent)
-- Some Other Race: 11,102 (1.6 percent)
-- Two or More Races: 51,875 (7.3 percent)

Now the same graph is presented again, after all those identifying as Hispanic are culled out of all the races and presented in a standalone mode (the Anchorage Daily News erroneously reported the number of Whites from Table 2 from 2000 instead of 2010, but the numbers below are straight from the table; whatever numbers the state finally uses will be the ones I use):

Total population: 710,231
-- Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 39,249 (5.5 percent)
-- White: 455,320 (64.1 percent)
-- Black or African American: 21,949 (3.1 percent)
-- American Indian and/or Alaska Native: 102,556 (14.4 percent)
-- Asian: 37,459 (5.3 percent)
-- Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 7,219 (1.0 percent)
-- Some Other Race: 1,111 (0.2 percent)
-- Two or More Races: 45,368 (6.4 percent)

Table 3 is similar to Table 2. However, it shows data for the six “race alone or in combination”categories. The concept “race alone or in combination” includes people who reported only a single race (e.g., Asian) and people who reported that race in combination with one or more of the other major race groups (i.e., white, black or African-American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, and some other race). The concept “race alone or in combination,” represents the maximum number of people who reported as that major race group, either alone or in combination with another race(s). The sum of the six individual "race alone or in combination" categories may add to more than the total population because people who reported more than one race were tallied in each race category. Table 3 is confusing and it is better to use Table 2 for precise racial reporting.

For people who reported two or more races, Table 4 shows the population in each of the 15 combinations of two races (for example, the number of people who reported being both white and black or African-American).

Table 5 shows the population in the major race categories and of Hispanic or Latino origin for Alaska's most populous county equivalents and incorporated places.

No comments:

Post a Comment